It's your device. It's your time. So make it your Internet.

#BeBraveDay

We've been busy at Brave building a solution designed to give users and publishers the fair deal they deserve on the Web. Today we're releasing our 0.9 developer version, which delivers what thousands have been asking for: the beginning of support for Chrome extensions with 1Password support, to help users better manage their security and privacy. Other password managers will follow soon. Another notable feature is the capacity to block phishing and malware, to make sure our users don't get hacked by dangerous domains. We are also introducing defenses against browser fingerprinting.

We've added these features because browsing the Web should be fast AND safe, and because users deserve to be in control of their data. Users are increasingly

Brave's Response to the NAA: A Better Deal for Publishers

The NAA has sent a letter to Brave Software filled with false assertions, indicating that they have fundamentally misunderstood Brave. Here are a few misconceptions we’d like to clear up: Brave is not, as the NAA asserts, “replac[ing] publishers' ads on the publishers' own websites and mobile applications with Brave's own advertising.” We do not tamper with any first-party publisher content, including native ads that do not use third-party tracking. Brave is not trying…

Brave's Payment Spec Out for Developer Input

UPDATE: some details in this post are obsolete; please see [new post]

At Brave Software, we love browsers. We love using them and we love coding them. As the user interface to the Web, we know how important browsers are to the Internet. And – if you've been following the story of Brave Software – you know that we are very concerned about anonymity, privacy and security. In particular, ad tracking and malvertising have become modern day threats. Even if some people don't care about being tracked, they do care about malware being delivered to their computer or mobile device via an ad. Furthermore, the entire ad network infrastructure constitutes an attack upon low latency and efficient use of network resources: numerous

How Brave Works for You

Last week I wrote:

“Brave is the only approach to the Web that puts users first in ownership and control of their browsing data by blocking trackers by default, with no exceptions.”

Our premise is that the Web requires ads for much of its funding, but not the poorly performing ads and trackers that drive users to ad-blockers. And we want to enable micropayments as an alternative, without requiring infrastructure changes from websites and publishers. Finally, we must protect Brave users from tracking and malvertisement.

This week I’d like to dive into the details of how Brave will achieve these goals of better ads for the Web, micropayments where users want them, and better revenue for everyone through cutting

How to Fix the Web

The Web is always in trouble for some reason or other. I remember when Microsoft came after Netscape and threatened to lock Web standards into IE. Only the Web is so big, with such reach to billions of users, that no one owns it. This means it will always be contested ground.

But the Web today faces a primal threat.

Some say the threat to the Web is “mobile”, but the Web is co-evolving with smartphones, not going away. Webviews are commonplace in apps, and no publisher of note is about to replace its primary website with a walled-garden equivalent. Nor can most websites hope to develop their own apps and convert their browser users to app-only users.

I contend